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When you want a divorce, but your spouse does not

On Behalf of | Jun 14, 2022 | Divorce |

The decision to divorce is not an easy one, and when one spouse is reluctant, the process can become even more complicated. If you are a Washington resident who has decided to end your marriage but your spouse is not in agreement, you need to prepare yourself for a challenging process. However, this does not necessarily mean that your divorce will be contentious. If your spouse eventually comes around, they might be open to a collaborative process such as mediation.

Your spouse’s agreement is not necessary for a divorce

It is important to understand that your spouse does not need to agree to a divorce. However, the actions based on their reluctance might delay and complicate the process, so you need to be prepared to remain firm about your decision. Even if your spouse is not in agreement, you will still need to have an agreement or a court order that addresses:

  • Child custody and support
  • Alimony
  • Division of assets and debts

Emotions can be intense

Divorce is highly emotional for both spouses. When a spouse is not in agreement with the dissolution of the marriage, they might experience a variety of emotions, including anger, fear and grief. This can lead them to act in vengeful or punishing ways. This might also cause you to react in anger and resentment, which will not help your divorce process.

Be compassionate and understanding

Though it might be difficult, approaching your spouse about the divorce in a compassionate and understanding manner towards their own feelings might help your situation. It might be a matter of waiting for your spouse to accept the inevitable, particularly if you have always spoken with confidence about your decision.

The path to divorce always involves difficult conversations. This is particularly true with a reluctant spouse. However, in the end, you will both survive this situation and move on with your lives.

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