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Making a divorce more manageable

On Behalf of | Mar 21, 2022 | Divorce |

No one thinks about an impending divorce on the day of their marriage, but a dissolution becomes a reality for a significant percentage of couples. The shock of entering into divorce proceedings leaves some emotionally shaken. While stress and anxiety are expected for many divorcing couples, allowing one’s emotional state to suffer might not be helpful. Washington divorce proceedings require careful attention to financial matters and other issues. Therefore, it could be in both spouses’ interest to have the most amicable divorce possible.

Organization and planning my help

Whether headed to trial or preferring settlement negotiations, each spouse should be organized for the chosen process. Presenting detailed documents, such as bank statements, property titles, insurance forms, and more, could keep things moving swiftly. Also, the potential for deception may decrease when the court reviews legitimate documentation.

If settlement negotiations don’t go well, the two parties could enter mediation. Suggestions from the mediator could help move things to a reasonable conclusion.

Also, bitterness and anger won’t help the process. Anyone hoping to make a divorce less taxing may wish to avoid petty and spiteful behavior.

A personal side to divorce proceedings

Divorce proceedings affect not only the spouses but also their children. Making things less disruptive for the kids could alleviate stress for all involved. Anyone trying to use a child as a “wedge” against the other parent might be doing the young one a great disservice. Expect the court to frown on such behavior.

Spouses might need to attend to their personal needs while divorcing. Building up a strong support network may help. Even going to therapy might assist someone who struggles with the emotionally trying process.

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